Skip to Main Content





Student Looking at Artwork in Museum
mosquito
globe

Discover Hopkins Programs

DH Courses

DISCOVER HOPKINS 2017 COURSE LISTINGS


DISCOVER HOPKINS:

Introduction to Lab Research

  • Session I (2 Sections)

Course Number: AS.020.120.41 (1 credit)
Instructor: Jaime Sorenson

  • Session II (2 Sections)

Course Number: AS.020.120.51 (1 credit)
Instructor: Jaime Sorenson

  • Session III (2 Sections)

Course Number: AS.020.120.61 (1 credit)
Instructor: Jaime Sorenson

Description: This course will introduce students to a variety of biochemical and molecular biological laboratory techniques. These will include DNA analysis by restriction enzyme mapping, amplification of DNA segments by PCR, lipid analysis by chromatography. Additionally, students will visit a variety of biological laboratories to observe actual research projects.

 

Psychological Profiling

  • Session III

Course Number: AS.200.205.61 (1 credit)
Instructor: Lawrence Raifman, J.D., Ph.D.

Description: Psychological Profiling focuses on strengths and limitations of psychological methods employed by forensic professionals who assist police in criminal investigations. Clinical cases of serial offenders, spree killers, disgruntled employees, police profiling, and terrorists will be studied. Legal and ethical issues will be explored, especially racial profiling controversies. We anticipate visits to the FBI Behavioral Sciences Unit at Quantico, Virginia; Baltimore County Forensic Crime Lab (with emphasis on crime scene analysis), and the Baltimore Police Profiling Program.

 

The Psychology of Police Deadly Force Encounters

  • Session I

Course Number: AS.200.210.41 (1 credit)
Instructor: Lawrence Raifman, J.D., Ph.D.

Description: A forensic psychologist and SWAT team leader evaluate split second decisions employed by police who use deadly force. Police shootings, and the media report of police use of deadly force against black males, has contributed to a further deterioration of police community relationships. Relying on case studies, we will focus on how police officer decisions concerning deadly force are made, what cause bad decisions, and whether specific training can improve decision making.

 

Physiology & Disease: Brain, Muscle, and Cardiopulmonary

  • Session II

Course Number: AS.360.101.51 (1 credit)
Instructor: Christopher Ciarleglio,PhD.

Description: An understanding of physiology is an invaluable part of any budding physician’s or scientist’s repertoire. This course introduces classical physiology in the human body, and how it functions in both health and disease. This, the first of a two-part course (Part II is optional¬†but should be a consideration), will cover core topics including nervous system, muscular, and cardiopulmonary physiology and disease. Additionally, students will be working outside the classroom to consolidate and reinforce their new understanding of the subject. Ultimately, knowledge of basic physiology should impact future research and serve as a foundation for all future scientific and biomedical endeavors.

 

Physiology & Disease: Renal, Digestive, Immune, Endocrinology, and Reproduction

  • Session III

Course Number: AS.360.101.61(1 credit)
Instructor: Christopher Ciarleglio,PhD.

Description: An understanding of physiology is an invaluable part of any budding physician’s or scientist’s repertoire. In this, the second of a two-part course introducing classical physiology in the human body, and how it functions in both health and disease, we will cover renal, digestive, and immune systems, as well as basic endocrinology and sex/reproductive physiology. In addition to classroom study, students will be challenged to synthesize their newfound knowledge by taking part in immersive afternoon activities. While this represents a wholly separate course, students should also consider taking the first part of this series to bolster their understanding. Ultimately, knowledge of basic physiological processes should impact the student's future research and serve as a foundation for all future scientific and biomedical endeavors.

 

Application of Abnormal Psychology to Forensic Cases

  • Session II

Course Number: AS.200.220.51 (1 credit)
Instructor: Lawrence Raifman, J.D., Ph.D.

Description: This introductory course will examine the basic diagnostic psychology principles with special application to forensic psychology. The class will focus on investigating forensic psychology queries including: Does my client have a mental illness? Why did he or she act in such a self-defeating way? Does the law require special disposition? Should my client be punished or rehabilitated? We will explore the reasons behind why a movie star would shoplift or a famous athlete would engage in a series of extra marital relationships; why a policeman would commit a series of bank robberies in broad daylight; or why someone would shoot a Congresswoman and kill and wound many others in the process.As part of this course, students will visit with doctors and lawyers (including Judges), view and analyze video and movies about forensic cases, and participate in mock trial exercises. ... More

 

The Hospital

  • Session I

Course Number: AS.360.118.41 (1 credit)
Instructor: Alicia Puglionesi, PhD

  • Session II

Course Number: AS.360.118.51 (1 credit)
Instructor: Alicia Puglionesi, PhD

Description: Most Americans were born in one and will die in one. Lots of you likely aspire to spend your careers in one. Hospitals stand at the center of modern health care as symbols of healing; below the surface, they perform all the technological and social functions of a miniature city. This class explores the past, present, and future of hospitals with a focus on Johns Hopkins, a global model for medical education and patient care.

Syllabus, .41: Download (.doc)

Syllabus. .51: Download (.doc)

 

Introduction to Biology & Medicine

  • Session III

Course Number: AS.020.129.61(1 credit) WAITLIST ONLY
Instructor: Dan Georgess

Description: Biology is the study of life dynamics, and medicine is the application of biology to enhance human health. With a particular emphasis on imaging approaches from the scale of the cell to that of the whole body, this course explores how biology research is designed to improve our knowledge and health. The goal is to show students the possible ways of using information learned in textbooks as a starting point to explore new application frontiers and careers in academic research, industrial/biotech development, and medicine. Course is highly interactive and includes lectures, readings, field trips, and guest lectures by professors involved in the scientific advancements. Grades determined by class participation, attendance, quizzes, and oral presentation.

 

Medical School Intensive

  • Session I (Montgomery County Campus)

Course Number: AS.360.163.45 (1 credit) WAITLIST ONLY
Instructor: Yuejin Li. PhD

  • Session II

Course Number: AS.360.163.55 (1 credit) WAITLIST ONLY
Instructor:Yuejin Li. PhD

  • Session III

Course Number: AS.360.163.68 (1 credit) WAITLIST ONLY
Instructor:Yuejin Li. PhD

Description: The 2-week program is designed to engage bright high school students who are interested in medicine. Taught and guided by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine faculty post-docs and fellows, students will learn basic knowledge and techniques related to surgery, internal medicine, pediatrics, emergency medicine, and biomedical science by participating in interactive lectures and labs, experiencing hands-on medical trainings at Johns Hopkins Medical Simulation Center, interviewing and networking with diverse medical professionals, and visiting the world-renowned hospital.

 

Medicine, Sports, and Culture

  • Session I

Course Number: AS.070.297.41 (1 credit)
Instructor: Thomas Thornton

  • Session II (Montgomery County)

Course Number: AS.070.297.52 (1 credit)
Instructor: Thomas Thornton

  • Session III

Course Number: AS.070.297.61 (1 credit)
Instructor: Thomas Thornton

Description: This course examines how medicine is practiced in different cultures around the world. In particular, we draw on theories and concepts from medical anthropology to study how these differences reveal alternative perspectives on the body, its health and its capabilities. To sharpen our inquiries into cultural differences surrounding bodily health, we look comparatively at the anthropology of sports and bodily performance. In looking at how concepts including illness, wellness, and injury differ across cultures, we consider, for example, how the bodily experience of pain not only varies according to societal beliefs and behaviors, but also changes as one pursues the limits of athletic performance. In addition to introducing how cultural anthropology engages with medicine and sports performance, this course enriches scientific interest in medicine by teaching students techniques of critical reasoning that powerfully investigate both how medicine is practiced and the cultural phenomenon of bodily health.  

(Prior study in anthropology is not required. We anticipate talks from two current medical residents who were undergraduate majors in anthropology, a high-level athlete, and a field trip to speak with physicians at the Maryland Medical Center.) 

 

BACK TO TOP

PROGRAM SCHEDULE 2017:

Monday - Friday
9:30 AM - 4:30 PM

SESSIONS:

  • Session I
    June 25 - July 8 (residential)
    June 26 - July 7 (commuter)
  • Session II
    July 9 - 22 (residential)
    July 10 - 21 (commuter)
  • Session III
    July 23 - Aug 5 (residential) July 24 - Aug 4 (commuter)

 

Other Programs

ESL

Sharpen and refine your speaking, reading, listening, and writing skills, or improve your test scores.
More Information >

Engineering

Engineering Innovation engages pre-college students in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education, inspires them to consider further studies and careers in engineering, and provides an understanding of basic engineering principles and skills.
More Information >