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Weekly Seminar: Fall 2012

Speaker: Dr. Shawn Shadden (Illinois Institute of Technology)
Title: "Cardiovascular Flow: Modeling, Measurement, and Characterization"

Date: Friday, October 5, 2012
Time: 11:00 a.m.
Location: Gilman Hall 50 (Marjorie M. Fisher Hall)


Abstract

Vast evidence suggests that localized disturbances to blood flow are strongly correlated to the localization of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, proper assessment of blood flow mechanics (hemodynamics) can be essential in understanding vascular disease progression, and evaluating different treatment options. Major obstacles in this area of research include (1) being able to generate accurate patient-based blood flow data, and (2) properly evaluating the data to extract information that is biologically or clinically important. Both of these obstacles are often challenging. We will discuss methods that we use to both measure and model in vivo hemodynamics using medical imaging and scientific computing. We will also discuss the application of a computational dynamical systems framework that enables rigorous characterization of unsteady hemodynamics. We will demonstrate how these tools offer unprecedented and valuable perspectives into cardiovascular flow problems, and how this framework is helping to shift the current "shear-centric" view of hemodynamics to a more complete appreciation and understanding of the biomechanical facets of blood flow, while providing the tools needed to make such understandings possible.

 

Bio

Shawn Shadden is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT). He graduated in 2001 from The University of Texas at Austin with a BS in Aerospace Engineering. He then obtained a PhD in the department of Control and Dynamical Systems at the California Institute of Technology in 2006 under Jerrold E. Marsden. His PhD thesis helped to pioneer fundamental work in computational dynamical systems methods for studying fluid advection. In 2006, he was awarded an NSF Mathematical Sciences Postdoctoral Research Fellowship to translate his work in dynamical systems theory to research on cardiovascular biomechanics at Stanford University from 2006-2009. In 2009 he joined the faculty at IIT. His research maintains both clinical and industrial collaborations, and is mainly supported by the NSF (Fluid Mechanics, Dynamical Systems, Mathematical Biology programs), and the NIH (National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute). In 2012, he was awarded an NSF CAREER award for his investigations into thrombosis.






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