Johns Hopkins Magazine
Johns Hopkins Magazine Current Issue Past Issues Search Get In Touch
   
O U R    R E A D E R S    W R I T E
Letters
 
[Send your letters via
email to [email protected]]
Thanks for unveiling a treasure

"Authentic" today, ripped out tomorrow

H.E.L.P. is available

Hard to read

Desecration doesn't constitute art

Faint praise deserved

More on alumni governors

The culture of words


Thanks for unveiling a treasure

I was delighted to find the painter Richard Sober in your column "Your Other Life" [September]. While there are echoes of Ryder, Van Gogh, and Dali in Sober's work, this is an artist whose style and vision are entirely his own. His genius is enthralling, complex, and wry. I have 13 of Mr. Sober's paintings on my walls and confess that I am perpetually greedy for more. In my opinion Richard Sober is a treasure that Baltimore has too long hidden. Thank you for bringing him forward.
Rosemary Mahoney (MA '85)
Providence, RI


"Authentic" today, ripped out tomorrow

Bravo! It's about time somebody rebelled against the Authenticity Tyranny ["Up From Authenticity," September]. Actually, everything is authentic something. (Not that I like some of the cheaper imitations.)

I wonder how the Good Taste Police view centennial antiques, made to look like the furniture of the century before? And hand-painted faux marble woodwork? It's "real" hand-painting, but "fake" marble. Hmmmm. A dilemma.

I'd love to hear the debates that occur on the restoration committee for historic old houses. Which is the "authentic" restoration date? The 1850 version? Or back to 1800? Or farther back to 1750? Or as originally built as a two-room cabin? Who decides? And how do they justify it?

Trends in antiques and historic styles have their seasons of popularity. What's restored today will be ripped out tomorrow.
Marcia Spires
New York, NY


H.E.L.P. is available

Joanne Cavanaugh Simpson's article on the safety of drugs during pregnancy was informative and important ["Pregnant Pause," September]. However, she neglected to mention the use of statins--the popular, powerful cholesterol-lowering drugs prescribed for people with high cholesterol levels. Women who must temporarily stop taking lipid-lowering statins while pregnant or nursing, but who need to control their cholesterol levels until they can resume drug treatment, should know about H.E.L.P. therapy.

H.E.L.P. is a safe, FDA-approved non-invasive treatment that uses a machine similar to kidney dialysis to selectively remove cholesterol from the blood. The Boston Heart Foundation, a non-profit clinic and research center, is one of a handful of sites in America that offers H.E.L.P. therapy. For more information, please call (617) 577-7336.
Carol Kort
Boston Heart Foundation
Cambridge, MA


Hard to read

The September issue contained several especially interesting articles, and the illustrations were excellent. However, I found the black background of pages 27 and 48-49, while artistic, made reading the print a challenge. I hope this is not going to become a regular feature of the magazine. Perhaps younger readers did not react in the same way, but I suspect you have a lot of senior alumni readers out there.
Doris Kaminsky Mela '49
Alexandria, VA
[email protected]


Desecration doesn't constitute art

Your exaltation of Brooklyn Museum curator Arnold Lehman (MA '66) for his "courage and fortitude" in the name of art serves no useful purpose other than to expose the prejudices of the editorial board of Johns Hopkins Magazine ["What's All the Fuss?" June]. Desecration of important religious icons does not constitute art, and those who subscribe to this hypocrisy in the name of free speech just lend credence to the fact that certain prejudices remain acceptable in America--anti-Catholicism foremost among them. I am deeply offended.
Stephen R. Strelec '73, MD
President, Western Pennsylvania Alumni Chapter


Faint praise deserved

"I read Amy's column because it's witty, in its way..." ["Getting Personal with the Web's Gossip Diva," September]. I've damned a few former students with faint praise in my time but Professor Kenner did it in spades! Because the professor said he read it, I went to salon.com and read Amy Reiter's September 6 contribution to the literature of the 21st century.

I did not bookmark the site.
James W. Woods '49 (PhD '54)
Columbia, MD
[email protected]


More on alumni governors

I would like to respond to Robert Torretti's letter in the September issue [p. 10] concerning U.S. governors who are Hopkins alumni.

Mr. Torretti is correct that Albert C. Ritchie qualifies for this list; Ritchie earned a BA from Johns Hopkins in 1896. Spiro T. Agnew attended Hopkins in the late 1930s but left without earning a degree. He also may have attended in the early 1950s. While we have student records for most individuals who attended Hopkins, Mr. Agnew's record is missing. It may have been removed from the files for safekeeping when he became Vice President (Hopkins had no Archives then), but it hasn't resurfaced.

I checked a list of Maryland governors and found no others who had been Hopkins students. There may have been governors of other states who are Hopkins alumni, but I am not aware of them.
James Stimpert, Archivist
MSE Library
[email protected]


The culture of words

Dr. Edward D. Miller, Hopkins Medicine CEO and medical school dean, needs some cultural change of his own. A 24-year-old woman is not a "girl" [September, p. 15]. Would he refer to a 24-year-old man as a boy?
George Halushynsky
Savage, MD
[email protected]

Return to November 2001 Table of Contents

  The Johns Hopkins Magazine | The Johns Hopkins University | 3003 North Charles Street |
Suite 100 | Baltimore, Maryland 21218 | Phone 410.516.7645 | Fax 410.516.5251